2017 TAP News

Get Ready for Taxes: IRS.gov Offers Free Tax Help

As tax filing season approaches, the Internal Revenue Service encourages taxpayers to visit IRS.gov first for tax tools and resources before calling. Nearly every tax issue can be resolved online.
 
The recent IRS website redesign makes it easier for people to navigate IRS.gov. The front page is more task-based so actions like paying a tax bill, getting a tax record or checking refund status are easily accessible.
 
The IRS has also simplified the main navigation tool, added more drop-down menus and made it more mobile-device friendly.
 
Additionally, the IRS has a special page on IRS.gov with steps to take now for the 2018 tax filing season.
 
IRS.gov provides many self-service tools and features, including:
  • Where’s My Refund. Taxpayers can check tax refund status 24/7. Updates daily.
  • Get Transcript. Access various transcript types online. Taxpayers may also ask the IRS to mail a Tax Return Transcript to them by requesting it online or by calling 800-908-9946. Allow 5 to 10 days for delivery.
  • Direct Pay. Make tax payments directly from a checking or savings account. People can view their account balance if taxes are owed.
  • Electronic Federal Tax Payment System. EFTPS is convenient and easy. Taxpayers and businesses can use it for various types of federal tax payments including estimated tax payments.
  • Online Payment Agreements. Eligible taxpayers can pay their taxes by easily setting up a monthly payment plan.
  • Answers to Tax Law Questions. The Interactive Tax Assistant takes people through a series of questions and provides the answers.
  • Forms, Instructions and Publications. Taxpayers can download and view popular tax forms, publications and instructions anytime. Increasingly popular eBooks are available as well as PDF and HTML versions. Accessible versions for people with disabilities and prior year forms are also available.
  • Where’s My Amended Return. Taxpayers can track the status of an amended return.
Employers and self-employed taxpayers will find many useful features on IRS.gov as well. The self-employed individuals tax center is a tax resource available around the clock. People can:
Business owners can find free small business tax workshops and seminars at various locations around the country.
 
Use the Understanding Your IRS Notice or Letter page to get more information and answers to many notice-related questions related to IRS notices and letters.
 
The Let Us Help You page on IRS.gov provides online tools and resources related to:
  • Identity Theft, fraud and scams
  • Links to help taxpayers determine who needs to file and options to e-file.
  • Assistance with renewing an expiring Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) should visit the ITIN information page on IRS.gov.
 

NTA Blog: IRS Policy Needs to Reflect the Reality of Retirement
for Today’s Taxpayers

The National Taxpayer Advocate (NTA) recently posted a blog stating that IRS policy needs to reflect the reality of retirement for today’s taxpayers.
 
The NTA said, “The IRS takes a conflicting approach to funds in retirement accounts. On the one hand, the IRS considers retirement accounts to be “special” and created guidance particular to retirement accounts because ‘retirement vehicles provide for the taxpayer's future welfare.’ However, a recent change in IRS policy has all but made the ‘special’ guidance meaningless.” To read the full blog, click here. Find her posts on the Tax Toolkit – NTA Blog page.
 

NTA Blog: Appeals Should Accept Good-Faith Requests to
Review Section 6702 Penalty Abatement Cases

In her latest blog, the National Taxpayer Advocate addressed the IRS Office of Appeals’ refusal to review whether a frivolous return penalty was properly imposed by Wage & Investment.
 
The NTA stated, “Appeals … has adopted the policy of refusing to review all IRC section 6702 cases, even those abatement requests that are determined by W&I to be non-frivolous.” To learn more, read the NTA’s blog here. The NTA will continue to post blogs addressing taxpayer issues and concerns. Find her posts on the Tax Toolkit – NTA Blog page.
 

Is it really the IRS calling?

Many taxpayers have encountered individuals impersonating IRS officials – in person, over the telephone and via email. Don’t get scammed. We want you to understand how and when the IRS contacts taxpayers and help you determine whether a contact you may have received is truly from an IRS employee.
 
The IRS initiates most contacts through regular mail delivered by the United States Postal Service.
 
However, there are special circumstances in which the IRS will call or come to a home or business, such as when a taxpayer has an overdue tax bill, to secure a delinquent tax return or a delinquent employment tax payment, or to tour a business as part of an audit or during criminal investigations.
 
To understand how and when the IRS contacts taxpayers and determine if it’s truly the IRS see: How to know it’s really the IRS calling or knocking on your door.
 

NTA Blog: IRS Policy Needs to Reflect the Reality of Retirement
for Today’s Taxpayers

The National Taxpayer Advocate (NTA) recently posted a blog stating that IRS policy needs to reflect the reality of retirement for today’s taxpayers.
 

NTA Blog: Appeals Should Accept Good-Faith Requests to
Review Section 6702 Penalty Abatement Cases

In her latest blog, the National Taxpayer Advocate addressed the IRS Office of Appeals’ refusal to review whether a frivolous return penalty was properly imposed by Wage & Investment.
 
The NTA stated, “Appeals … has adopted the policy of refusing to review all IRC section 6702 cases, even those abatement requests that are determined by W&I to be non-frivolous.” To learn more, read the NTA’s blog here. Find her posts on the Tax Toolkit – NTA Blog page.
 

Is it really the IRS calling?

Many taxpayers have encountered individuals impersonating IRS officials – in person, over the telephone and via email. Don’t get scammed. We want you to understand how and when the IRS contacts taxpayers and help you determine whether a contact you may have received is truly from an IRS employee.
 
The IRS initiates most contacts through regular mail delivered by the United States Postal Service.
 
However, there are special circumstances in which the IRS will call or come to a home or business, such as when a taxpayer has an overdue tax bill, to secure a delinquent tax return or a delinquent employment tax payment, or to tour a business as part of an audit or during criminal investigations.
 
To understand how and when the IRS contacts taxpayers and determine if it’s truly the IRS see: How to know it’s really the IRS calling or knocking on your door.
 

NTA Blog: IRS Letters to Taxpayers

The National Taxpayer Advocate (NTA) published a new blog post related to IRS letters to taxpayers. In the blog, the NTA stated, “The IRS should specifically identify potentially frivolous positions in the letters it mails to taxpayers, so as to give them a better opportunity to correct the positions and comply with tax laws.”
 
To read on for more insight from the NTA on IRS letters to taxpayers and Internal Revenue Code, click here. Find her posts on the Tax Toolkit – NTA Blog page.
 

NTA Blog: Affordable Care Act Estimators

In a recent blog on the Affordable Care Act, the National Taxpayer Advocate (NTA) wrote, “With the open enrollment period for the Health Insurance Marketplace beginning November 1st, it is the appropriate time to remind taxpayers and preparers of the various Affordable Care Act (ACA) estimators the Taxpayer Advocate Service (TAS) has developed and made available to the public.”
 
The NTA outlines tools for individuals and employers to assist in estimating credits and payments related to the ACA. To learn more about these tools, read the NTA’s blog here. Find her posts on the Tax Toolkit – NTA Blog page.
 

NTA Blog: Findings on EITC-TAS Study

The National Taxpayer Advocate (NTA) posted a new blog about Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). In 2016, TAS conducted a study to see whether providing taxpayers with more tailored information about their claims for EITC, which appeared to be erroneous, would help them avoid making errors in the future. The study showed that the taxpayer’s improved compliance behavior depended on the type of Dependent Database rule that was broken.
 
To read more about EITC, the study and its results, read the NTA's blog, available here. Find her posts on the Tax Toolkit – NTA Blog page.
 

TAP in Action: TAP Member Jacob Torres and Puerto Rico
LTA Daniel del Valle Join Efforts

Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (TAP) member, Jacob Torres and Daniel del Valle, Local Taxpayer Advocate for Puerto Rico/International continue to partner together in their outreach efforts. Together they met with Ricardo Rosello, Governor of Puerto Rico, William Villafañe, Secretary of the Governor, Francisco Pares, Sub-Secretary of the Puerto Rico Treasury Department (Hacienda) and Olga Castellon, Sub-Secretary of the Puerto Rico Department of Justice.
 
They advocated proactively by discussing issues directly impacting their taxpayers due to the uniqueness of the tax code of Puerto Rico. One topic discussed was the adverse impact that the local Lien Filing System (Sistema Karibe) is having on taxpayers. They ended the meeting with a commitment to follow-up on several issues and to work together to minimize the number of ID Theft cases and raise awareness on how taxpayers can avoid being victimized.
 
Mr. Torres and employees from Puerto Rico TAS participated in a retirement and benefits clinic for the U.S Army Garrison in Ft. Buchanan, Puerto Rico. After receiving an invitation from Miguel Aponte, Retirement Services Officer in 1st Mission Support of the Department of Defense, TAS employees visited with active duty service members, retirees, veterans and Veteran Affairs Administration Executives from Washington D.C. LTA Daniel del Valle, TAGM Simara Perez, LCA Elaine Rios, Intake Advocate Miguel Falcon, and Case Advocates Eva Reyes and Linnette Pares discussed the mission of TAS, ID Theft, and other topics. The Puerto Rico TAS Team went the extra mile by interviewing several taxpayers and accepting new TAS cases. There was a large turnout at the event, as the retirement and benefits clinic drew almost 1,000 people.
 

NTA Blog: IRS policy weakens requirements for penalties

The National Taxpayer Advocate (NTA) posted a new blog arguing IRS administrative policy and recent litigation weaken supervisory approval requirement for penalties.
 
In the blog, the NTA states, “The supervisory approval requirement is an important part of the taxpayer’s right to a fair and just tax system. The IRS’s current interpretation allows it to sidestep considering the taxpayer’s facts and circumstances in those situations where they are most important – where the IRS asserts negligence based on an automatic calculation.” More information about the NTA’s stance on IRS administrative policy, litigation and supervisory approval requirements for penalties, is on her blog. Find her posts on the Tax Toolkit – NTA Blog page.
 

NTA Blog Addresses Tax Reform

The National Taxpayer Advocate (NTA) Nina Olson recently posted a blog advocating for simpler tax code amid heightened discussion of tax reform in Congress. The NTA argues that U.S. taxpayers have been struggling under the weight of the current tax code for too long. According to the NTA, “Tax code simplification is critical,” because “code complexity is terrible for taxpayers, terrible for the IRS, and terrible for tax compliance.”
 
To read more about the NTA’s stance on tax reform, read her blog here. Find her posts on the Tax Toolkit – NTA Blog page.
 

IRS Offers Help to Hurricane Victims: A Recap of Key Tax Relief
Provisions Available Following Harvey, Irma and Maria

On Sept. 26, 2017, the Internal Revenue Service offered a rundown of key tax relief that has been made available to victims of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria.
 
In general, the IRS is now providing relief to individuals and businesses anywhere in Florida, Georgia, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, as well as parts of Texas. Because this relief postpones various tax deadlines, individuals and businesses will have until Jan. 31, 2018 to file any returns and pay any taxes due. Those eligible for the extra time include:
 
  • Individual filers whose tax-filing extension runs out on Oct. 16, 2017. Because tax payments related to these 2016 returns were originally due on April 18, 2017, those payments are not eligible for this relief.
  • Business filers, such as calendar-year partnerships, whose extensions ran out on Sept. 15, 2017.
  • Quarterly estimated tax payments due on Sept. 15, 2017 and Jan. 16, 2018.
  • Quarterly payroll and excise tax returns due on Oct. 31, 2017.
  • Calendar-year tax-exempt organizations whose 2016 extensions run out on Nov. 15, 2017.
 
A variety of other returns, payments and tax-related actions also qualify for additional time. See the disaster relief page on IRS.gov for details on these and offer relief the IRS has offered since these hurricanes began hitting in August. The IRS also continues to closely monitor the aftermath of these storms, and additional updates for taxpayers and tax professionals will be posted to IRS.gov.
 
Besides extra time to file and pay, the IRS offers other special assistance to disaster-area taxpayers. This includes the following:
 
  • Special relief helps employer-sponsored leave-based donation programs aid hurricane victims. Under these programs, employees may forgo their vacation, sick or personal leave in exchange for cash payments the employer makes, before Jan. 1, 2019, to charities providing relief. Donated leave is not included in the employee’s income, and employers may deduct these cash payments to charity as a business expense.
  • 401(k)s and similar employer-sponsored retirement plans can make loans and hardship distributions to hurricane victims and members of their families. Under this broad-based relief, a retirement plan can allow a hurricane victim to take a hardship distribution or borrow up to the specified statutory limits from the victim’s retirement plan. It also means that a person who lives outside the disaster area can take out a retirement plan loan or hardship distribution and use it to assist a son, daughter, parent, grandparent or dependent who lived or worked in the disaster area. Hardship withdrawals must be made by Jan. 31, 2018.
  • The IRS is waiving late-deposit penalties for federal payroll and excise tax deposits normally due during the first 15 days of the disaster period. Check out the disaster relief page for the time periods that apply to each jurisdiction.
  • Individuals and businesses who suffered uninsured or unreimbursed disaster-related losses can choose to claim them on either the return for the year the loss occurred (in this instance, the 2017 return normally filed next year), or the return for the prior year (2016). See Publication 547 for details.
  • The IRS is waiving the usual fees and expediting requests for copies of previously filed tax returns for disaster area taxpayers. This relief can be especially helpful to anyone whose copies of these documents were lost or destroyed by the hurricane.
  • If disaster-area taxpayers are contacted by the IRS on a collection or examination matter, they should be sure to explain how the disaster impacts them so that the IRS can provide appropriate consideration to their case.
 
Further details on these and other relief provisions can be found on the agency’s disaster relief page, as well as on the special pages for Hurricane Harvey and Hurricanes Irma and Maria. For information on disaster recovery, visit disasterassistance.gov.
 

Know Your Taxpayer Bill of Rights

Every taxpayer has a set of fundamental rights and the IRS has an obligation to protect them. The “Taxpayer Bill of Rights” groups the taxpayer rights found in the tax code into 10 categories. Know these rights when interacting with the IRS. A good way to learn about them is by reading Publication 1, Your Rights as a Taxpayer.
 
Below are the descriptions of each right, as listed in Publication 1:
 
  • The Right to Be Informed. Taxpayers have the right to know what to do in order to comply with the tax laws. They are entitled to clear explanations of the laws and IRS procedures on all tax forms, instructions, publications, notices and correspondence. They have the right to know about IRS decisions affecting their accounts and receive clear explanations of the outcomes.
  • The Right to Quality Service. Taxpayers have the right to receive prompt, courteous and professional assistance in their interactions with the IRS. They also have the right to be spoken to in a way they can easily understand, to receive clear and easily understandable communications from the IRS, and to speak to a supervisor about inadequate service.
  • The Right to Pay No More Than the Correct Amount of Tax. Taxpayers have the right to pay only the amount of tax legally due, including interest and penalties and to have the IRS apply all tax payments properly.
  • The Right to Challenge the IRS’s Position and Be Heard. Taxpayers have the right to raise objections and provide additional documentation in response to formal IRS actions or proposed actions. They also have the right to expect the IRS to consider their timely objections promptly and fairly and to receive a response if the IRS does not agree with their position.
  • The Right to Appeal an IRS Decision in an Independent Forum. Taxpayers are entitled to a fair and impartial administrative appeal of most IRS decisions, including many penalties and have the right to receive a written response regarding the Office of Appeals’ a decision. Taxpayers generally have the right to take their cases to court.
  • The Right to Finality. Taxpayers have the right to know the maximum amount of time they have to challenge an IRS position as well as the amount of time the IRS has to audit a particular tax year or collect a tax debt. Taxpayers have the right to know when the IRS has finished an audit.
  • The Right to Privacy. Taxpayers have the right to expect that any IRS inquiry, audit or enforcement action will comply with the law and be no more intrusive than necessary, and will respect all due process rights, including search and seizure protections and will provide, where applicable, a collection due process hearing.
  • The Right to Confidentiality. Taxpayers have the right to expect that any information they provide to the IRS will not be disclosed unless authorized by the taxpayer or by law. Taxpayers have the right to expect appropriate action will be taken against employees, return preparers, and others who wrongfully use or disclose taxpayer return information.
  • The Right to Retain Representation. Taxpayers have the right to retain an authorized representative of their choice to represent them in their dealings with the IRS. Taxpayers have the right to seek assistance from a Low Income Taxpayer Clinic if they cannot afford representation.
  • The Right to a Fair and Just Tax System. Taxpayers have the right to expect the tax system to consider facts and circumstances that might affect their underlying liabilities, ability to pay, or ability to provide information timely. Taxpayers have the right to receive assistance from the Taxpayer Advocate Service if they are experiencing financial difficulty or if the IRS has not resolved their tax issues properly and timely through its normal channels.
 
The IRS will include Publication 1 when sending a taxpayer notices on a range of issues, such as an audit or collection matter. Publication 1 is available in English and Spanish. All IRS facilities will publicly display the rights for taxpayers.
 
Avoid scams. The IRS will never initiate contact using social media or text message. First contact generally comes in the mail. Those wondering if they owe money to the IRS can view their tax account information on IRS.gov to find out.
 
Additional IRS Resources:
 
IRS YouTube Videos:
 

TAS assistance offered at local Problem Solving Days

The Taxpayer Advocate Service (TAS) will conduct Problem Solving Day events in communities throughout the country in the coming months and year. During these events, TAS employees from a local office will be available to assist taxpayers in person with tax problems they have not been able to resolve with the IRS. Generally, TAS can assist taxpayers whose problems with the IRS are causing financial difficulties, who’ve tried but haven’t been able to resolve their problems with the IRS, or believe an IRS system or procedure isn’t working as it should. And our service is free.
 
Why is TAS holding Problem Solving Days?
 
Congress created the Office of the National Taxpayer Advocate as we know it today through the IRS Restructuring and Reform Act of 1998 (RRA 98). The law further strengthened the role of TAS and provided for Local Taxpayer Advocates in each state. TAS maintains a geographic presence in each state, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, and continues to look at changing taxpayer demographics to adjust its footprint to meet taxpayer needs. Recognizing the importance of personal contact, we work one-on-one with taxpayers and their representatives within our area to resolve their tax issues.
 
As the IRS develops its “Future State” plan that focuses on assisting taxpayers digitally rather than in person, the National Taxpayer Advocate continues to elevate her concerns about the plan through her Reports to Congress. Ms. Olson conducted twelve public forums in 2016 to hear from taxpayers throughout the country on their needs and preferences when dealing with the IRS. A consistent concern raised during the forums was IRS’s continuing trend away from person-to-person and face-to-face taxpayer service and compli­ance activities, including audit, collection, and appeals, as well as a declining geographic IRS presence and increased centralization. The National Taxpayer Advocate included her findings in her 2016 Annual Report to Congress Special Focus which discussed her vision for a taxpayer-centric 21st century tax administration.
 
We are Your Voice at the IRS. Look for a Problem Solving Day event in your community from the list below. Otherwise, you can contact your local TAS office by visiting www.TaxpayerAdvocate.irs.gov/contact-us.
 
Upcoming Problem Solving Day Events:
 

NTA Blog Series on Private Debt Collection: Hardship
(Part 2 of 3)

In the second of her three part series on the Private Debt Collection (PDC) program, the National Taxpayer Advocate (NTA) outlines her long held concerns about outsourcing tax debts to private debt collection agencies (PCAs).
 
The NTA states, “I believe the new PDC initiative inappropriately burdens taxpayers who are likely experiencing economic hardship, including those with incomes at or below the federal poverty level.” The NTA’s blog post on the PDC program continues here on the National Taxpayer Advocate blog.
 

Eight Tips to Protect Taxpayers from Identity Theft

Identity theft happens when someone steals personal information for financial gain. Tax-related identity theft happens when someone uses another person’s stolen Social Security number (SSN) or Employer Identification Number (EIN) to file a tax return to obtain a fraudulent refund.
 
Many people first find out they are victims of identity theft when they submit their tax returns. That’s because the IRS lets them know someone else already used their SSN to file.
 
The IRS continues to work hard to stop identity theft with a strategy of prevention, detection and victim assistance. So far, the agency has stopped millions of dollars from getting into the hands of thieves.
 
Check out these eight tips on how to protect against identity theft:
  • Taxes. Security. Together. The IRS, the states and the tax industry need everyone’s help. The IRS launched The Taxes. Security. Together. awareness campaign in 2015 to inform people about ways to protect their personal, tax and financial data. Learn more at www.IRS.gov/TaxesSecurityTogether
  • Protect Personal and Financial Records. Taxpayers should not carry their Social Security card in their wallet or purse. They should only provide their Social Security number if it’s necessary. Protect personal information at home and protect personal computers with anti-spam and anti-virus software. Routinely change passwords for online accounts. 
  • Don’t Fall for Scams. Criminals often try to impersonate banks, credit card companies and even the IRS hoping to steal personal data. Learn to recognize and avoid those fake communications. Also, the IRS will not call a taxpayer threatening a lawsuit, arrest or to demand immediate payment. Beware of threatening phone calls from someone claiming to be from the IRS. 
  • Report Tax-Related ID Theft. Here’s what taxpayers should do if they cannot e-file their return because someone already filed using their SSN:
    • File a tax return by paper and pay any taxes owed.
    • File an IRS Form 14039, Identity Theft Affidavit. Print the form and mail or fax it according to the instructions. Include it with the paper tax return and/or attach a police report describing the theft if available.
    • File a report with the Federal Trade Commission using the FTC Complaint Assistant.
    • Contact Social Security Administration at www.ssa.gov and type in “identity theft” in the search box.
    • Contact financial institutions to report the alleged identity theft.
    • Contact one of the three credit bureaus so they can place a fraud alert or credit freeze on the affected account.
    • Check with the applicable state tax agency to see if there are additional steps to take at the state level. 
  • IRS Letters. If the IRS identifies a suspicious tax return with a taxpayer’s stolen SSN, that taxpayer may receive a letter asking them verify their identity by calling a special number or visiting an IRS Taxpayer Assistance Center.
  • IP PIN. If a taxpayer is a confirmed ID theft victim, the IRS may issue them an IP PIN. The IP PIN is a unique six-digit number that the taxpayer uses to e-file their tax return. Each year, they will receive an IRS letter with a new IP PIN.
  • Report Suspicious Activity. If taxpayers suspect or know of an individual or business that is committing tax fraud, they can visit IRS.gov and follow the chart on How to Report Suspected Tax Fraud Activity.
  • Service Options. Information about tax-related identity theft is available online. The IRS has a special section on IRS.gov devoted to identity theft and information for victims to obtain assistance. 
For more on this Topic, see the Taxpayer Guide to Identity Theft.
 
Avoid scams. The IRS does not initiate contact using social media or text message. The first contact normally comes in the mail. Those wondering if they owe money to the IRS can view their tax account information on IRS.gov to find out.
 
Additional IRS Resources:
 
IRS YouTube Videos:
 

NTA Blog Series on Private Debt Collection Program

The National Taxpayer Advocate (NTA) posted a blog series on the Private Debt Collection Program (PDC). The first blog post describes what the PDC program is and the NTA’s stance on the program.
 
The NTA states, “Even with this Congressional mandate, as I explained in my 2016 Annual Report to Congress, and my recently released Fiscal Year 2018 Objectives Report to Congress, I believe the IRS has overstepped its statutory authority in implementing its current Private Debt Collection (PDC) initiative.” 
 
Read more about the NTA’s stance on the PDC program on the National Taxpayer Advocate blog.
 

IRS Office of Appeals Pilots Virtual Service

The Internal Revenue Service Office of Appeals will soon pilot a new web-based virtual conference option for taxpayers and their representatives. This virtual face-to-face option will provide an additional option for taxpayer conferences. The IRS expects it to be especially useful for taxpayers located far from an IRS Appeals office.
 
Each year, the Office of Appeals hears appeals of more than 100,000 taxpayers attempting to resolve their tax disputes without going to court. Currently, taxpayers involved in the appeals process can meet with an Appeals Officer by phone, in person or virtually through videoconference technology available only at a limited number of IRS offices. 
 
While a phone call works well for most taxpayers, others prefer face-to-face interaction. Appeals’ pilot program will use a secure, web-based screen-sharing platform to connect with taxpayers face-to-face from anywhere they have internet access. Similar to popular screen-sharing programs used on phones and home computers, this technology may also be a way for the IRS to provide greater access, efficiency and flexibility to taxpayers. This web-based model is more convenient and has more features than the existing video-conferencing technology.
 
“Taxpayers who choose the web-based option will be able to get face-to-face service remotely,” said IRS Chief, Appeals Donna Hansberry. “In the future, the technology may give taxpayers greater options in engaging with Appeals and could allow us the flexibility to serve taxpayers virtually from any location using mobile devices or computers.
 
 “We hope this is one more option to enable IRS employees to provide timely, efficient and effective service to taxpayers,” said Hansberry.
 
Appeals plans to start the pilot Aug. 1, 2017 and will assess the results, including taxpayer satisfaction with the technology.  
 
The IRS reminds taxpayers that their right to appeal an IRS decision in an independent forum is one of 10 key rights guaranteed to taxpayers under the Taxpayer Bill of Rights. Other rights especially relevant to the appeals process include the right to quality service, the right to pay no more than the correct amount of tax, the right to challenge the IRS’s position and be heard and the right to retain representation. For a complete list of the Taxpayer Bill of Rights, see Publication 1, Your Rights as a Taxpayer, available on IRS.gov. 
 

IRS introduces an email option for Direct Pay and the
Electronic Federal Tax Payment System

Direct Pay is a secure service that allows you to pay your taxes for Form 1040 series, estimated taxes or other associated forms directly from your checking or savings account at no cost to you.
 
You can easily keep track of your payment by signing up for email notifications about your tax payment, each time you use IRS Direct Pay.
 
  • Email notification will contain the confirmation number you receive at the end of a payment transaction. 
  • The IRS continues to remind taxpayers to watch out for email schemes. You will only receive an email from IRS Direct Pay if you’ve requested the service. 
 
If you have already made a payment through Direct Pay, you can use your confirmation number to access the Look Up a Payment feature. You can also modify or cancel a scheduled payment until two business days before the payment date. 
 
You can also view your payment history by accessing your&
 

 

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